Ten Technologies That Deserve to Die - Lie Detectors
By Bruce Sterling, (c) October 2003, MIT Technology Review

[The CCLE's position with respect to brain fingerprinting devices, and other new fangled deception detection devices based on brain imagining, is that such technology is fine when used voluntarily. Law enforcement and other government agents, however, should be barred from forcibly extracting a person's innermost thoughts by compelling the person to be brain fingerprinted. When used by corporations we view it as distasteful and as disturbing as urine testing. Learn the CCLE's other thoughts on mental surveillance.] 

Here's what Bruce Sterling thinks:

Ten Technologies That Deserve to Die - Lie Detectors
By Bruce Sterling, (c) October 2003, MIT Technology Review

Some technologies are so blatantly obnoxious that the human race would rejoice if they were summarily executed. A humorist and science fiction writer offers some candidates.

Technologies die rather routinely—seen a Conestoga covered wagon lately?—but it’s rare for them to be singled out and righteously put to death. Some technologies, however, are so blatantly obnoxious that the human race would rejoice if they were obliterated. A wise society would honor its young technical innovators for services rendered in annihilating obsolete technologies that are the dangerous hangovers of previous, less advanced generations. Let me offer some candidates.

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9. Lie Detectors
They just plain don’t work. They might have some vague use in increasing the psychological stress of a subject under interrogation, but galvanic skin response and heart rate have little to do with the process of lying. The use of lie detectors is basically a voodoo ritual that allows large institutions to lie to themselves about the trustworthiness of their employees.

Even if lie detectors did work—say, with newfangled nuclear magnetic-resonance brain scans—they would become an Orwellian intrusion. Furthermore, there would likely be a social revolution as major actors in society, from top to bottom, had to admit to fabricating their lives out of spin and wishful thinking. The official public version of our means, motives, and opportunities is severely divorced from the private world of our interior thoughts. If we were forced to confront and reveal our brain functions through technological means, most of us would soon discover that we led half-baked lives of quiet intellectual desperation, in which very little thought of any kind ever took place.