ARCHIVE OF INFORMATION ON THE:

Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000
(House Bill 4553)

AND

Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000
(Senate Bill 2612)

 

Note:

Important October 4, 2000 update!

 

LAW LIBRARY ARCHIVE ON FEDERAL "ECSTASY" BILLS (YEAR 2000)

 

1.   Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000  (House Bill HR 4553)

On May 25, 2000, Representatives Biggert (Illinois) and Rogan (California) introduced the Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000 in the House of Representatives.

Update: September 7, 2000
On July 25, 2000, the House Judiciary Committee appended the Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act to the Methamphetamine Anti-Proliferation Act and passed the combined bill, which is now called the "Methamphetamine and Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000" (H.R. 2987). A full vote by the House is expected this month, perhaps as early as next week. Significant Problems Lurk in the club drug provisions of HR 2987 
>> Read more

Previous updates:

July 26, 2000: club drug act rolled into meth. act (plus other changes)

On Tuesday, July 25, 2000 the House Judiciary Committee concluded its examination of the Methamphetamine Anti-Proliferation Act (H.R. 2987) after making several important amendments, one of which appended the Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act to the Meth. Act. >> Read More!

CCLE Analysis:

Analysis of the club drug anti-proliferation act of 2000
Our analysis of the Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000 (H.R. 4553), as it was introduced by Representative Biggert of Illinois on May 25, 2000.  >> Read Analysis

Update to Above Report: "What's (Still) Wrong with the Methamphetamine and Club Drug Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000."  >> Read September 7, 2000 Update 

October 4, 2000 Update >>go

Visit CCLE general MDMA (Ecstasy) Law and Policy Pages

 

Government Sources of Info:

Check status of combined Meth/Club Drugs bill  HR 2987

Check current status of original HR 4553

Representative Biggert's Press Release (July 25, 2000)
Commenting on Appending the Club Drug bill to the Meth. Act.

Introduction of Bill in House. (Biggert, Rogan)
Congressional Record for May 25, 2000

Representative Biggert's Press Release (May 25, 2000)

 

2.  Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000
    (Senate Bill 2612)

Important October 4, 2000 update!

On May 23, 2000, Senators Graham (Florida), Thomas (Wyoming), Grassley (Iowa) and Biden (Delaware) introduced the Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act in the Senate. The bill calls for stiffer prison terms for ecstasy-related offenses and for a blackout on certain information concerning the drug. >> learn more

Update: September 7, 2000
The Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000 (S. 2612) is now on its way to the Senate Judiciary Committee. It continues to contain provisions that would ban the dissemination of information on the “use” of Ecstasy. If H.R. 2987 (see above) passes with the Club Drug Provisions intact, S. 2612 will be allowed to die on the vine. If the Club Drug provisions of HR 2987 are struck for one reason or another, then S.2612 will continue to wind its way through Congress.

CCLE Analysis:

Analysis of the ecstasy anti-proliferation act of 2000
Our analysis of the Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000 (S. 2612), as it was introduced by Senator Graham on May 23, 2000.  >> Read Analysis

Report on the National Ecstasy & Club Drugs Conference
On Monday, July 31, 2000, through Wednesday, August 2, 2000, the DEA held a “National Ecstasy & Club Drugs Conference” in Washington, D.C., for the purpose of providing information on MDMA (Ecstasy) to local, state, federal, and international law enforcement agents. >> Read Full Report

Visit CCLE general MDMA (Ecstasy) Law and Policy Pages

 

CCLE News Releases on S.2612

 

 

Updates and News on S.2612

Check current status of, and read, S.2612

 

Government Information on S.2612

 

General Law and Policy Information from CCLE

 

Articles about the above bills or about
the War on Drug Information

  • Buzz Kill Village Voice article by Russ Kick.

  • The War on Information Salon article by Ted Oehmke.

  • Online Free Speech on the Line Article from the MoJo wire.

  • A Duty to Censor: U.N. Officials Want to Crack Down on Drug War Protesters. Excellent article from Reason magazine about ongoing attempts by the U.N.'s International Narcotics Control Board to wipe the world free of dissent, as well as drugs.

 

Related Information